Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Cinnamon-Date Almond Butter Cookies (grain-free, dairy-free, gluten-free)



In need of a healthy treat for road trips this summer? These date-sweetened, flourless almond butter cookies pack well and are adored by children...a treat you can feel good about giving!

I have not tried this recipe using other nut or seed butters yet. It's possible the recipe might work using roasted cashew butter or roasted sunflower seed butter. I've also only made these with eggs but since the recipe uses just one egg you might be able to replace it with a "chia egg" (1 tablespoon finely ground chia seeds whisked with 3 tablespoons of warm water).

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Nasturtium and Kohlrabi Salad with Creamy Lemon-Dill Dressing



I love making big salads in the summertime with the abundance of fresh, organic vegetables we have growing in our garden. Each day it's a different salad. Sometimes I get on a kick and will use the same vegetables and dressing for days in a row. Lately I've been making this amazing Creamy Lemon-Dill Dressing. It's so good, I usually double the recipe below so I can have leftovers for the next day!

I've been posting photographs and the occasional recipe (or at least the ingredients) to my Instagram account. So be sure to go there to get the scoop on how we live this organic, gluten-free, whole foods lifestyle daily with five children.

If you are not familiar with nasturtium or kohlrabi….let me explain. First off, it's great for our bodies and our taste buds to experience new flavors and new plant chemicals. Remember, your genetics have less to do with your health than the environment that they are exposed to. Research has discovered over tens of thousands of miraculous plant chemicals in the last few decades, and it appears that each plant has it's own powerful array of these compounds.

The nasturtium plant is an annual that produces beautiful bright orange edible flowers and tender green leaves, both of which have a delicate peppery flavor. They are great companion plants for your garden, attracting beneficial predatory insects.  Kohlrabi is a cruciferous vegetable, sometimes known as a German turnip, that is delicious either raw or cooked. I prefer eating it raw in salads, or as an alternative to chips for homemade dips. We use the tender, mild tasting greens as wraps in place of tortillas.

Sunday, July 6, 2014

Plantain Crepes (grain-free, nut-free)


I created this simple plantain crepe recipe one morning on a whim, out of a need to feed my family. The kids were starving, begging for something quick. I had a bunch of plantains on my counter and plenty of pastured eggs in my fridge so I just tossed ingredients into the Vitamix and came up with a very easy gluten-free and grain-free crepe recipe. Everyone loved them, and a few minutes later all of the crepes had disappeared! The kids were hungry for more, so I made another batch, measured everything carefully, and jotted the recipe down so we could make them again. These simple whole food crepes have now become a breakfast staple!

There are so many ways you can serve them. Here are our favorite sweet and savory ideas. Just add the fillings to one side of the crepe, then roll it up and enjoy! Please share in the comments your favorite fillings!

Sweet:
long strips of bananas and dollops of raw almond butter
a sprinkling of cinnamon and coconut sugar
homemade berry jam and a dollop of coconut sour cream
mashed fresh strawberries and a dollop of organic Greek yogurt

Savory:
smoked wild salmon, baby arugula, chives, and organic cream cheese
cashew cream cheese, organic turkey slices, fresh dill, butter lettuce
hummus, avocado, red onion slices, and broccoli leaves
cabbage sautéed with cumin seeds, leftover cooked chicken, and sliced avocado or guacamole

Thursday, July 3, 2014

Mustard Green-Lime Pesto (dairy-free, vegan)



If you've been shopping at your local Farmer's Market lately you might have noticed some beautiful purplish-green leafy vegetables for sale called mustard greens. My bet is that you've also wondered what you could do with them if you were to purchase them! Mustard greens are spicy and slightly bitter. I like to add them to soups and stir-fries. They are part of the lovely cruciferous vegetable familythe types of vegetables we highly recommend getting into your diet everyday in order to boost your body's own detoxification abilities. Read more about that in this post.

I grow mustard greens in my garden, and this summer I've had more than we can eat! I pondered for a week or so how I could preserve them, other than lacto-fermentation (as in a mustard green kim chi), and came up with this pesto recipe (which can be frozen). While I was figuring out how to preserve them, they began to bolt. This means that they send up flowers so the plant can bear seeds. When a plant bolts, the greens start to become bitter. I did not want to waste them so I used them anyway. I would suggest looking for tender young mustard greens to use in this raw pesto recipe, though it's still delicious if your greens have begun to bolt!