Friday, April 15, 2011

Gluten-Free Bread (xanthan-free, vegan)


Today I have a very unique recipe to share. A gluten-free bread recipe that needs to be kneaded! It is made of whole grain flours and is also free of xanthan gum, starches, nuts, eggs, and dairy. Last August I began creating kneadable dinner rolls and braided bread free of the above mentioned ingredients. But something was missing. You see, I grew up making whole wheat bread from scratch with my mother. When I was two years old I was at the counter kneading bread. In high school I would bake my own bread for sandwiches. I have missed the feel of bread dough.

A few months ago I decided to try adding psyllium husk to my bread to see what would happen....and wow....gluten-free bread that really kneads! I was already using ground chia seeds, which help to hold moisture and bind everything together. But the combination of psyllium husk and ground chia works wonders! Psyllium is a fiber that is used in colon cleansing. It also works wonders on lowering cholesterol levels. It can be found on amazon.com or at your local health food store. Be sure to look for "whole psyllium husk." Whole chia seeds can be found at your local health food store and online. See the tip at the bottom of the recipe for grinding them.

If you try this bread, I would love your feedback in a comment below. Or, you could even upload a photo to our Facebook Page! I have many more kneadable gluten-free, xanthan-free, vegan bread recipes in my book, Nourishing Meals. Some examples include Buckwheat Cinnamon Raisin Bread, Everyday Sandwich Bread, and Sourdough Teff Bread! Enjoy!




Farmhouse Seed Bread

There are so many variations to this bread. I've made it into an Olive-Rosemary bread using 1 cup pitted kalamata olive sliced thin and 2 to 4 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary. You could also try a Garlic-Seed bread by adding in chopped fresh garlic and seeds. I am sure there are many more variations. If you have a corn allergy, try replacing the cornmeal with almond meal. I have made this bread with many different flour combinations so feel free to experiment, but this one is my favorite for flavor and texture. The bread gets its crusty crust from being baked on a stone pan with a pan of water on the lower oven rack. The steam from the water helps to form the crust. The bread will be a little gummy hot out of the oven so be sure to let it cool a bit before cutting into it. Slice it and serve with a good quality olive oil for dipping. It is also delicious spread with either almond butter or hummus!

Wet Ingredients:
2 ½ cups warm water (105 to 110 degrees F)
2 ¼ teaspoons active dry yeast (1 package)
1 teaspoon maple syrup or organic cane sugar
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons maple syrup
1/3 cup ground chia seeds

Dry Ingredients:
1 cup teff flour
1 cup sorghum flour
½ cup sweet rice flour
½ cup cornmeal
1 ½ teaspoons sea salt

Topping:
extra virgin olive oil
poppy seeds
sesame seeds

Place the warm water in a bowl or 4-cup liquid glass measure. Add the yeast and teaspoon of maple syrup, whisk together. Let rest for 5 to 10 minutes to activate the yeast. The mixture should get foamy or bubbly. If not, dump it out and start over.

While the yeast is activating, mix together the dry ingredients in a large bowl.

After the yeast is activated whisk in the olive oil, maple syrup, ground chia seeds, and psyllium husks into the water-yeast mixture. Let stand for 2 to 3 minutes (not any longer) to let the chia and psyllium release their gelatinous substances. Whisk again.

Dough after kneading, before rising.


Pour the wet ingredients into the dry and mix together with a large wooden spoon until thick. Then knead the dough on a floured wooden board to incorporate the flour. Add more teff and sorghum flours, a little at a time, until the dough holds together and isn’t too sticky (about ¼ to ½ cup total). Don’t add too much flour, otherwise the dough will become very dense; it should still be slightly sticky. Form dough into a ball, place back into the large bowl, and cover with a damp towel. Place in a warm spot to rise. I like to place the bowl over a pot of warm water. Let dough rise for an hour or until doubled in size. Rising time will depend on the temperature of the environment around the dough.


Dough after rising for one hour.


After the dough has risen, place a pizza stone in your oven. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Place a pan of water on the bottom rack of the oven (the one beneath the pizza stone). I usually use an 8 x 8-inch glass pan filled ¾ of the way full.


Dough on its second rise.


Punch down the dough and turn out onto a lightly floured wooden board. Knead the dough for about a minute. Then form into a round ball. Place on a square of parchment paper and use a sharp knife to cut a shallow “tic-tac-toe” pattern on the top. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with poppy seeds and sesame seeds. Let rise for about 30 minutes in a warm place while the oven and stone are preheating.


Hot out of the oven!


Carefully lift the parchment paper with the risen loaf and place it onto the stone in the oven. Bake for about 40 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool 30 to 60 minutes before cutting into it. The bread will be very gummy hot out of the oven. The texture is perfect once cooled. It reminds me of a hearty whole wheat bread.

Tip: Be sure to buy whole chia seeds and then grind them very finely in a coffee grinder or the dry container of your Vita-Mix. If using a Vita-Mix, it is best to grind at least one cup at a time so they grind properly. Store them in a glass jar in your fridge for no longer than a week. 
Note: If you are adding garlic or olives to this bread, add them in when you are kneading the dough the first time. 




More Xanthan-Free Baking Recipes:



145 comments:

  1. I absolutely cannot wait to try this, Ali! I'm out of my kitchen right now visiting my sister, but the minute I'm home this bread's on the menu. :)

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  2. Just beautiful! Seriously! I am making this THIS weekend! Our friend was recently diagnosed with Celiac Disease and he literally had tears in his eyes when he told me how much he would miss bread! LOL I told him I would make him some that would forget about his gluten-filled breads of the past! Guess what I will be making him this weekend? Thanks for sharing this, Ali! So excited about it!
    xo
    k

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  3. I would love to try this recipe! I can't get teff flour in Australia (at least not that I know of), is there anything I could use instead of that?

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    1. you can get Teff flour at most health food stores.

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  4. Ali you always have wonderful recipes but this looks truly amazing. I do not have much bread making experience but this looks too good to pass up. I'll just have to give it a try.

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  5. I remember you telling me about this bread, Ali. I'm so happy that you're sharing it today. It's gorgeous. :-)

    xo,
    Shirley

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  6. I am SO excited to try this recipe. THANK you!

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  7. What an amazing and beautiful loaf of bread! I can not wait to try it!! Thanks for everything you do to make living gluten free easier, Ali!

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  8. YAY!!! I cannot WAIT to try this ALI!! Thank you SOOOOO much!!

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  9. Wow! I am super impressed with this bread! I've been trying to make a vegan gluten free bread but I've never been brave enough to try without xathan gum. If I don't have a pizza stone, will a normal pan work?

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  10. could you use something in place of cornmeal. We don't eat corn. Thanks
    Jenn

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  11. I can't have corn. Is there a flour you would suggest using in place of cornmeal?

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  12. Beautiful rustic loaf! Gorgeous color.

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  13. Thanks everyone! I have not made this without a stone so your best bet would be to try using a good quality stainless steel cookie sheet. As for the corn, I mentioned in the recipe headnotes that you could try replacing it with almond flour. I've also made this bread a number of different ways using different flour combos. Start with 3 cups of your favorite gluten-free flours and knead more in as necessary. It can also be baked in a 9 x 5-inch bread loaf pan (I use glass). Hope you enjoy it as much as we do! -Ali :)

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  14. This is absolutely heavenly. It seems to be a very flexible, even forgiving recipe. I've tried to learn to like tedd but I just couldn't do it, so I substituted millet flour which is available in Kuwait, where we live. I don't have chia seeds, so I used flax instead. Despite my many modifications, I was thrilled with the deep, rich flavour and the bread-like texture that I often crave. Oh my! I think I shall be able to make a real stay-together sandwich. This is my ULTIMATE favourite.

    So, tonight I was able to enjoy a truly rustic meal of potato and leek soup, with some oh-so-delicious bread and crisp salad. What a treat!

    Interestingly, I previously slipped some psyllium into my husband's bran muffins when there wasn't quite enough bran for the recipe. He didn't seem to notice.

    Thanks again.
    Bonnie

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  15. I am always looking for whole grain GF breads and this looks perfect. Only trouble, I can't tolerate psyllium - could I use flax?

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  16. This looks absolutely amazing. I'm stocking up on ingredients tomorrow so that I can make this. I can't wait!!! Thanks for sharing!

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  17. Karen - I don't think this would work without the psyllium. I found this to be the key ingredient. If you can think of another fiber similar to psyllium please let me know! :)

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    1. Ali - I am wondering where you can get all these assortment of flours for not a crazy price. Also, how would you suggest to store these flours?
      Thank you! I am just about to start going gluten free after trying so many things to resolve my health and in particular digestive issues. I just feel awful, it's so hard though when my husband will not. O well, have to do it!

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  18. Wow - this is one of the best gluten free recipes I have ever seen! Love that you use chia seeds!!

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  19. Hi - Just found your site yesterday!! Love looking through all the recipes. I do have a question on this recipe - is it crucial to grind the chia seeds? I don't have a coffee grinder (and I'm still waiting patiently for my vitamix!) Looking forward to making this bread soon!

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  20. Ali-A beautiful crusty bread! Wow! I am sure this will fill a big need in many gluten-free kitchens! Great job!

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  21. I made this! It was amazing! The flavor was unsurpassed in GF breads, in my opinion. Love Teff!

    I did use honey, and would recommend people decrease it to 1 - 1.5 Tb unless you like your bread slightly sweet tasting. I also used almond meal and it worked great.

    REALLY looking forward to trying some of the suggested variations!

    If anyone, is curious I did run the nutrition info and assuming 1 loaf is 15 slices, It is 161 calories/6 g fat/200 mg sodium/24 g carbs/5.5 g fiber/4 g prot. 5% calcium, 6% each of iron and selenium.

    I guess it's a bit hefty per slice... which explains why I felt so full after gobbling down 3 slices!! Will make a great breakfast bread with peanut butter and bananas.

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  22. Holy. Cow. I CANNOT wait to try this! I thought bread dipping was a thing of the past, but no more! This is a beautiful looking peasant loaf :)

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  23. Thanks everyone for the great comments, and thanks to Evaline for posting the nutritional breakdown.
    Laura - yes you certainly need to grind the chia seeds to make this bread. Your new Vita-Mix will do the job once it finally arrives! ;-)

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  24. This bread is amazing and easy to make - reminds me of when I was a kid too! Making bread with my Sicilian grandma - what a great memory to evoke! The flavor and texture are perfect! I normally hate psyllium seed/powder - those colon cleanse drinks are awful - but this is definitely an awesome way to get fiber! As usual, Ali, you and your recipes ROCK!

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  25. This blog is such a godsend... I recently found out I have to eat gluten-free but I LOVE to cook, and possibilities seemed so limited... not to mention that now I'm pregnant and my husband has so many hereditary allergies that I have to stay off of those foods, too, until the baby's weaned. Now I finally think I found a bread that will taste and feel like BREAD!!! But I can't find Teff flour anywhere. Will brown rice flour substitute?

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  26. Hi,

    I used my Magic Bullet to grind the chia seed as I do not own anything else to do that... but it works great. The flat/grinding blade works on small amounts of grains, spices, coffee beans, etc. The other blade is great for smoothies and for salad dressings. I highly recommend it for an inexpensive but small grinder..

    this bread is rising on the board as we speak.. closest thing I have ever seen to real bread dough. My dd and I are both on dairy free and gluten free diet...

    thanks
    Laura

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  27. lippian84 - You can order teff flour online. I buy it from azurestandard.com in 25 pound paper bags. The cost for that is $41. You can also find it on amazon in a 4-pack form Bob's Red Mill and the cost for that is $28 for 6 pounds. Quite a difference! I would also read the comments above as there were some changes made using other flours. If you don't want to buy teff online then I would give one of your other favorite GF flours a try, if it is brown rice flour, then try that one. ;)

    here are the 2 links:
    https://www.azurestandard.com/shop/product/791/

    and

    http://www.amazon.com/Bobs-Red-Mill-24-Ounce-Packages/dp/B000EDI0X2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1303174088&sr=8-1

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  28. Wow Ali, that is such a cool recipe! I love kneading bread and have always found gluten-free bread lacking in that way. The psyllium must add a lot of fiber too!

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  29. What a clever way to make a bread! I made this bread yesterday and had to have a piece late last night, after it cooled! Just fantastic. What grabed me for this recipe was no starches! I was short on time so I just dumped everything into a Kitchen Aid mixer and let it do the work. It turned out absolutely gorgeous! It did not look GF at all! Hubby thought it was rye bread! It is really good just with nice butter and jam, that was my morning breakfast. I will make this bread from now on!Thank you!!!

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  30. This looks like regular whole grain bread, beautiful rise and crust! Thanks for this recipe, I can't wait to try it.

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  31. Hi Ali,
    Are psyllium husk whole flakes the same as whole psyllium husks? Can't wait to try this bread. It looks delicious!
    Thanks,
    Jan

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  32. This recipe sounds great. Can I use ground flax seeds instead of the ground chia seeds?

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  33. Jan - Yes I believe those are one in the same. I think the only other way to buy psyllium is in the powdered form.

    Gretchen - Not sure about using flax - it has about half the binding power as chia so it may not work as well, but is worth a try.

    thanks! :)

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  34. OK, Ali, you did the impossible (I thought) with this one. this will be my go to bread recipe now. I love it! everyone at the Easter dinner table loved it, the gluten free guy the most, of course, but everyone else gobbled it to. and it is lovely and satisfying to knead. Thank you for sharing!

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  35. Wow kneadable gluten free bread! Can not wait to try this!!

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  36. Fine cornmeal or polenta-like cornmeal?

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  37. Jennifer - I use Arrowhead mills brand which is organic and gluten-free. It is a finer grind cornmeal, not like polenta. Enjoy! :)

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  38. This looks really lovely! I definitely need to try this recipe. I love chia seeds instead of gums - the texture is so much better - and although I've never tried baking with psyllium, this sounds intriguing enough I'll have to try it.

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  39. I made this this morning; it is awesome! I swapped buckwheat flour for teff and almond flour for cornmeal. It made my whole house smell just like the honey wheat bread I used to make before going GF.

    I have a question: have you tried making this in a bread pan? If so, what size? I would like to experiment with this recipe, trying to get a bigger "rise" to the loaf for using as a sandwich bread...

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  40. Ali, just read one of your comments that it can be made in a 9x5 inch pan, so I will try this next time. (My loaf is already half gone in a matter of three hours! My kids love it!)

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  41. Ali. OMG. This is amazing. I made this tonight, and it's lovely and soft, and a hearty flavor. And it doesn't fall apart! For vegan and gluten-free bread, (and gum-free) that's a miracle. I used almond flour instead of the corn and it came out beautifully.

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  42. I made this for visitors we've had from Holland today (a gluten-loving land if ever there was one) and they loved it. In fact, my friend said it reminded her of Dutch bread - generally a bit denser and hardier than ours. Many Dutch folks eat bread and cheese for breakfast, lunch and sometimes dinner, so it has to be hardy!. And the true test came when I had some of this gluten-free loaf alongside slices of whole wheat bread in a basket on the table and both my children and the Dutch children went for the gluten-free choice. That is a huge accomplishment! And re: making with honey, with 2 tbsp maple syrup, I don't find the bread sweet at all, just well-balanced. Honey must make it sweeter...

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  43. We made this bread last week and it turned out quite successful. We are happy that this recipe contains chia seeds instead of flax, as one family member is sensitive to flax seed. Here is my blog post about it. http://wildflowermorningrecipes.blogspot.com/2011/05/farmhouse-seed-bread-part-2.html

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  44. Hi Ali,
    After all the exciting posts about how wonderful everyone's bread turned out, it was encouraging to me to read the last post. My bread also did not turn out so well. It was VERY moist. I obviously did something wrong. When I added the chia seeds, I didn't know I had to mix them in RIGHT AWAY (I think I waited 30 seconds) and the mixture started to severely clump. I then spent probably way too long trying to unclump the mixture. Definitely longer than your recommended 2-3 minutes. Do you think that is why my bread turned out a bit on the gooey side on the inside?

    Also, I wanted to remind people that cutting a pattern onto the top of the loaf is not the same for gluten laden breads. Make your cut VERY shallow. I cut mine as I would for regular wheat bread and it was too deep.

    The flavor was excellent, though.

    Thanks Ali. Learning all the time!

    Sincerely,
    Barbara

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  45. I wonder if I might be able to use ground psyllium, which I have on hand? I think I would have to use less than the amount of whole husk used in the recipe. Is there a reason why it has to be whole psyllium husks (other than the fact that there could be gluten contamination in the grinding process)? I think I might just dive in and try it because I'm so curious to make this recipe.

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  46. So I've made it and, WOW, it's amazing. We can't do corn or nuts, so I ground up sunflower seeds to replace the corn meal/almond flour. I think I understand why you say to use whole psyllium husks. My ground psyllium (I used 1/4 C) didn't completely mix into the water and there are these small pockets of goo scattered around the loaf. Nothing too bad, but I bet the whole husks would go into the water better and less clumpy. Thank you for this amazing, totally different GF bread that will become our main bread (once I buy proper psyllium husks).

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  47. Okay, so I am the only baker that had challenges. I need to not make comments when I am falling asleep! =) Any suggestions for mixing in the chia/psyllium combo to prevent clumping would be greatly appreciated, though. Thanks! Barbara

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  48. Hi Everyone,
    My son and I have multiple allergies and can't have most commercially made anything. So, I decided to give this bread a try. It's also my first ever bread that I made. The first time I tried I kept husks and seeds for 3 minutes and it was WAY too long since they all got thick and unmanageable. I didn't give up though and mixed the "liquids" with flours. I just had to add more oil while kneeding to bring it all together and the outcome was really good.

    The second and third time I made this bread I only let husts and seeds soak for 1 minute and it worked. I've been making this bread almost every week and we both like it. The only thing that I wish I could improve is that the bread is still a little gummy and "wet" even after it cooled, but that's not a big deal considering all the benefits this bread has for us :-)

    I wonder if anybody tried making hamburger buns instead of the whole loaf and if so, how long was the cooking time?

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  49. I am so excited to try this recipe! I just ordered the psyllium husks and chica seeds online (I haven't seen them up here in Alaska) and hopefully this will be my go to recipe. Thanks!

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  50. I find the chia/psyllium trick to be very useful. I made a loaf using only corn meal. Where I live, blue corn is what grows locally (altitude), so I can get it cheap and grind it myself. It suits me because I do not like xanthan gum or complicated flour mixtures. Finally, something simple. The only draw back is that chia imparts a slightly bitter taste. However, it is very mild, and I find that I am coming to like the taste.

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  51. I made this bread last night - it is delicious! Finally a gluten free bread that tastes like regular bread!. I followed the recipe exactly as is, although I didn't grind the chia seeds (didn't realize my mistake until it was too late). It has a really nice crust on the outside, and is moist (but not gummy) on the in side. This will definitely become my go-to gluten free bread recipe!

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  52. I've taken this great recipe and combined it with the GF Boule recipe from Artisan Bread in Five Minutes to make a lighter-flavored loaf. Here is the combo recipe at my blog, "Growing Healthy": http://growinghealthy.posterous.com/delicious-kneadable-gluten-free-bread-recipe

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  53. YOU'RE A GENIUS! This is great! It's crusty, hearty, healthy, pretty, forgiving, variable. DELICIOUS! Thanks for sharing.

    To poster above me, I was also thinking that it would be great for Everything Bagels. Do you know how to make bagels?

    Q: How do you tell when bread is done baking? I wonder if it needed another 5 minutes? I think it needs to cool a bit more, and if I baked it longer, it might be too dark on the outside.

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  54. I have made bagels with my recipe (which is a variation of Ali's recipe combined with AB in 5's GF boule). The bagels are AMAZING. They really are bagels! Here's my xanthan-free bagel recipe: http://growinghealthy.posterous.com/homemade-gluten-free-onion-salt-bagels-xantha

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  55. I made the Farmhouse Seed Bread. I subbed quinoa flour for the sorghum flour and ground flaxseed for ground chia seed.
    (I used a pizza crisper rather than a pizza stone). An hour after removing the bread from the oven, it is still quite gummy.

    I guess the fact that the chia seed, which I later read in your blog, has double the binding power of flax is the answer... or part of it?

    Quinoa flour may also be involved in the equation. Quinoa is a wonderful flour (or so I find) that I've used in my attempts at GF sourdough bread.
    It thickens the batter and makes it spongy. It also has a faster rise than other flours. Hence, my decision to use it.
    My batter rose more and spread much more than the one in your photo. I even tried to fold the dough under to make it smaller.

    I'll give this all another try with ground chia seed and maybe keep the quinoa flour and let it rise less. Or maybe I'll try it with sorghum flour.
    If you have any comments, I'd love to hear them.
    Thanks

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  56. For those of you who have had this bread turn out too gummy or "wet" after baking, just add more flour (teff or sorghum) while kneading. Kneading gluten-free bread dough until the right consistency has been reached will take some getting used too but after a few times it will become second nature.

    Make sure you use ground chia and not flax. Chia seeds absorb quite a bit more liquid than flax. Using flax could cause the bread to turn out too gummy.

    I am not sure that quinoa flour would have caused poor results. Maybe next time use part quinoa and part sorghum and see how that works.

    You can also let it rise only once in a 9 x 5-inch bread pan and then bake after one hour of rising. Bake on your oven rack, no need for the pizza stone or pan of water when making it into a bread loaf. You can coat the top with a nut milk or hemp milk for a crustier crust.

    I have made this bread many different ways now. Try different flour blends. I have used quite a few. The bread works great with at least 1/2 cut sweet rice flour, tapioca flour, or arrowroot powder. You don't need to add cornmeal...try another flour instead.

    Good luck everyone and happy bread baking!!! :)

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  57. This is my all-time favorite gluten free recipe, hands down! I have always wanted something kneadable, that my little ones could help to pat and shape, and this fit the bill, but I wasn't expecting it to be as delicious as it was!! We have made this several times with several different blends of flour, and it hasn't gone wrong yet. Perfect every time and tastes like "regular" bread- and the smell and feel are the real thing. Thank you so much! I share it with everyone :)

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  58. This is an AWESOME recipe. We make it every time we make soup. THANK YOU for such a healthy, full fiber, wonderful textured recipe!

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  59. Have you tried a grain free version of this? I'd love one ;0

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  60. Hi Ali,

    After a few times of making the farmhouse seed bread, I succeeded in making a good bread and figured out how much flour and how much kneading is needed. I turned some of the dough into pita and bagels.

    Thanks so much, Ali for the wonderful recipe. I look forward to any new bread recipes you write up, whether leavened with commercial yeast or wild yeast.

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  61. Can I sub buckwheat flour for the sorghum? I have made this before realizing I have problems with sorghum and corn and it was really good but I did have trouble with it being too moist in the middle.

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  62. Just made this bread and LOVED IT!! Thanks so much for the recipe. I didn't have all the ingredients (no psyllium, no chia, no teff) so i changed a few things. The dough was VERRY sticky and not kneadable, but the resulting loaf was excellent. Here's what i did:

    2 cups sorghum flour
    1 1/2 cups brown rice flour
    1 cup corn flour
    1/2 cup potato starch
    1 1/2 tsp sea salt
    1 tsp xanthan gum (i think i could probably have left this out)
    1/4 cup flax meal

    The wet ingredients i did the same as the recipe. And just for kicks i sprinkled caraway seeds on top instead of poppy/sesame, ala rye bread. Also i don't have a pizza stone so i did parchment paper on a steel baking sheet and it worked great.

    I can't say enough how delicious this bread was!!! Definitely a keeper. I'm making it again today. Thanks again!

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  63. I've made this bread many times and love it! Today I absentmindedly forgot to grind the chia seeds. (woops!) It still tastes great. WHEW! Just wanted to post for those of you who were concerned about not having a means for grinding the chia.

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  64. We have made this bread several times, it's our favorite for soup night. So tonight....we're making mini loaves; breadbowls!! I know it will be just perfect!

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  65. I made this this afternoon, for tonight's dinner. Everyone loved it, including my friend who is a big traditional bread baker. I did use flax instead of chia, and after reading the comments I know why it was a bit too moist. It is still good. I can't wait to have it toasted tomorrow. Thanks for sharing!

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  66. I made this tonight, following the recipe to the tee, except using foccacia spices as a topper instead of sesame seeds. Everyone loved it, the bread was easy to make and the instructions extremely easy to follow (except it doesn't say how much psyllum husks, so i did 1/3 cup). Love it!! Will be making it again and I'm extremely excited!!

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  67. actually, the recipe is perfect - my printout just cut out the psyllium husks . oops!

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  68. Made this bread tonight for dinner with chili...my family LOVED it! I wish I could post a picture of my results. Also, I wanted to know if I can make other bread products with this? (hamburger buns, bagels etc.)

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  69. I just tried this recipe - and it is AMAZING! This bread is so good. I think it's the only bread I will make from now on! Just curious...do you have any other recipes using Psyllium Husks???

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  70. Here's another great, easy psyllium husk recipe for tortillas from Gluten Free Easily: http://glutenfreeday.com/?p=77

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  71. Thank you for the psyllium husk tortilla recipe! It looks very interesting, and I will try it for sure. I have seen general references to replacing xanthum gum with psyllium husks - anyone know the how to do this/what the ratio might be??? Thanks!

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  72. Kristen, here's another psyllium husk recipe from my own blog for a pizza crust: http://growinghealthy.posterous.com/gluten-free-pizza-crust-vegan-xanthan-free

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  73. This looks great. Can't wait to try it! I'm a gluten free mommy who loves to try new recipes, especially without the gums. I've blogged a few of my adventures at www.forhimandmyfamily.blogspot.com FOllowing you!

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  74. I and my family all have a terrible time digesting Teff. I have tried this with Coconut flour and oat ban instead of Teff and cornmeal.
    Annie

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  75. Oh my word, I just made this and waited for it to cool... and now I scarfed three slices down in no time at all! This is absolutely delicious, and rather easy to make, once you collect all the ingredients. I will definitely make it again and again and again!
    I might bake it for five extra minutes though. It looks like the centre of the loaf dropped down a bit since it cooled. Could be gooey in the middle?

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  76. Thank you sooo much for this recipe! I have been gluten free for about a year now. I have truly missed making bread. I used to make bread every week. I loved kneading it and shaping it. After I entered the gluten free bread world, poof went kneadable. This loaf is reminiscent of a loaf that my husband and I loved out of James Beard's book "Beard on Bread". I never thought I would taste anything that was gluten free that ever tasted anything like that of my gluten memories.

    Thank you for making so many things that my whole family can eat and enjoy. You are truly a lifesaver!

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  77. This is the best gluten-free bread I've tried yet! Thank you thanks you thank you!! It's simply awesome and very delicious.

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  78. This is far and away the best gluten free bread recipe I've ever tried! My daughter loves it. It bakes beautifully on a baking stone - our only frustration is the round loaf turns out so tapered that there are few slices that are appropriate for sandwiches.

    I've solved that dilemma by taking a long sheet of parchment paper and folding it lengthwise into a strip about 4"high. I formed my bread into a nice high loaf shape - it's so "gutsy" that it keeps its shape very nicely.

    I then stapled the strip into a circle and then folded and stapled down the outside to create four "sides" so it was in the basic rectangular shape of a loaf pan.

    It held the bread into the loaf shape beautifully - I let it cool with the collar in place and now have a more sandwich-friendly loaf of wonderful bread. Thanks so much for this awesome recipe!

    Jo

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  79. Hi! Your blog is gorgeous. Do you happen to have any gluten free bread recipes that don't use starch? I'm trying to find recipes that don't include any extra starches. Thanks! :)

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  80. Sunflower - try a bread recipe that uses all coconut flour, which is high protein and fiber. It's usually just coconut flour, a bunch of eggs, and some rising agent. No starch. I don't have a recipe to recommend off the top of my head, but if you do a search for "coconut flour bread recipe" you'll get some ideas.

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  81. Can this be made in a bread maker?

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  82. Hi, Thought I'd mention the print function cuts off the 1/3c psyllium husk from the wet ingredient listing. I just bought the psyllium husk today and will be trying this shortly! Thanks. Karen

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  83. After two years of looking for a favorite GF bread, this is it! And it has been for a while!

    Anyone try to freeze this bread? Does it stay soft upon thawing??

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  84. Can you share how to use my sourdough starter instead of dried yeast?! thank you!

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  85. I started making this bread this week. I too am thrilled with a gluten free bread that you can knead. I have been desperate for a "real" bread that I can make. This completely satisfies me. I also made my own version of this. I mill my own flour as well. My version (and it works beautifully) is for a cinnamon raisin bread.
    I used 2 cups Sorghum, 1 cup arrowroot powder and 1 cup millet flour. I knead in the extra millet flour and it varies (it's about 1/8th of a cup). I add 1 cup raisins and 2 T cinnamon. I love the texture of this. My kids love it too. They are 16 months and 6 years old. I don't think I will ever tire of making variations of this bread. Thank you Ali for being so intuitive for this miracle. :-)
    Shakti

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  86. Can this dough be made in a bread maker? I know that defeats the purpose of getting your hands dirty, but I've never ever made bread and I wouldn't know how to knead it!!

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  87. i am allergic to psyllium so i was wondering if there is anything i could do with this recipe? i am having lots of challenges right now with multiple food allergies which i hope clear up as i repair my digestive system with the elimination of gluten. But i have been a breadmaker for a long time---but this is all new territory for me and i am missing bread.
    :)

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  88. This bread is AWESOME!! Hands down, the best gluten-free (and Vegan! Woot!) bread recipe yet, and we have been gluten free for about 6 or 7 years. It was crusty, which is a miracle, AND it was chewy but not as dry and dense as most gf breads. Thank you!!

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  89. out of sweet rice flour. What can I substitute for that?

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  90. I just made this last night and it was awesome! I didn't have teff flour, so I substituted millet, and it turned out beautifully. This is my go to recipe from now on!

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  91. Your gluten-free bread recipe is fantastic! I have made it a couple of times and everyone who has tasted it has been astonished to find out that it is gluten-free.

    I wanted to make gluten-free bread because of dissatisfaction with what is available in stores. I have been unable to find anything that meets my standards. Your recipe addressed two of my main objectives: vegan and whole grain. The third objective for me was to have a completely organic bread. I am still working on this as neither organic teff flour nor organic sorghum flour are available locally. I found a source for organic sorghum flour: http://www.dakota-prairie.com/

    I haven't found organic teff flour in the US, but I did find organic whole teff and my housemate made it into flour in his Vitamix. Here is the source for the grain in case others are interested:
    http://www.wildernessfamilynaturals.com/product/GRT4.php

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  92. Tried doubling the recipe, though I need to play with that more as it was very solid on the bottom - did not rise properly the second time. Froze a loaf for a couple of weeks and it comes out great. Moist and does not crumble.

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  93. Oh my goodness, this bread is amazing. I'm pretty new to the GF scene. It's been a little over a year since I stumbled upon your website, desperately searching for answers to my at the time infant sons digestion issues. I skipped the 2 day detox and went straight to phase one of the elimination diet and my son started sleeping through the night, no more endless spit up and he was a much happier baby after that, not to mention my own health improved drastically! I've been battling eczema, acne and IBS for years with no clue that gluten might be the.culprit. Anyway, now that I've written a novel......thank-you so much for these recipes. Even my picky eater loves to try these new recipes with me.....God Bless!!

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  94. This is the most amazing GF bread I have ever tasted. In fact, it's just great bread, GF or not. I have never used teff before and I can't believe how much it tastes like whole wheat. I put some Olivio Coconut Spread on it and felt like was back in my pre-GF days just eating a fabulous slice of bread and butter. I literally did a little dance in my kitchen. Thank you!!!

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  95. Might be a little late in the day to ask, as this hasn't been commented on since 2011, but I found this and want to try it. Only question I have is, would it be terrible to buy ground chia seed? I'm waiting on a grinder that I want, that's out of stock at the moment. I noticed they sell bags of ground chia at the health food stores. Any reason it wouldn't be as good as grinding them myself?

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  96. HEY, i have only found this in a few places, but, i was wondering if you guys have ever tried a over-night ferment of the dough, with 1/3 the yeast but like a cup of kefir or yogurt. ??

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  97. I just tried this bread with a few (unintended) modifications. LOL
    I thought I had all the different flours. Didn't. It is very cold outside so I used Bob's Red Mill Gluten Free flour instead of the two 1 cup flour amounts.
    Everything else was as required. I even let it cool for an hour (not easy). It is delicious! Fantastic! I had a sandwich immediately. The texture and taste are amazing.
    Thank you very much!!!!

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  98. It's just fantastic!! Great real bread, nothing to envy gluten bread. I'm baking my second at this moment. In the future I'll try sustituying teff and sorghum flours with other gluten-free flours, as it's not easy to find sorghum and teff in italy. I'll give a go to buckwheat and rice and see what happens. For the chia seeds...do you think I could substitute with flax seeds? Chia seeds are quite expensive here and I would like to make this bread my everyday bread! Thanks you! Great recipes!!
    Susana

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  99. I've made this bread a couple of times and we love it! However, it seems to get a little doughy in the middle.. I've tried cooking it longer than the 40 minutes, but it still doesn't seem quite done...Should I let it bake for a lot longer? Am I not letting it rise long enough?

    What's the best way for storing it too?

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  100. I just tried this and it was pretty tasty. Mine did end up tasting a bit "yeasty". Not sure that it rose enough. I'll have to try again.

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  101. This bread mixed together really nice. It rose nice. I had such high hopes. I baked it 40 min.s Very gooey. I can only cut 2 or 3 slices and there's so much goo sticking to my bread knife I can't cut anymore. It has to be toasted. I'm not fond of the taste, assuming it must be the teff.

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  102. Just made this today! It came out AMAZING!!! Thank you so, so much!!

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  103. Great comments! Has anyone adapted this recipe so it can be made in a bread machine? And which setting do you use?

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  104. This recipe is very flexible, I love it, it even worked at my high altitude! You were right--adding 1/4 cup more flour the second time I made it got rid of the slight gumminess.
    The second time I used all different flours based on a gluten-free flour volume-weight conversion chart (my $10 walmart scale is a lifesaver). I used 120g brown rice, 127 g millet flour, 60 g sweet rice flour, 44 g cornstarch, and 64 g gf oat flour. Then I added in 1/4 cup millet flour while kneading. I also added 1/4 chopped green onion and about 1 1/2 tsp minced garlic. I drizzled the top with butter (couldn't resist) and a lemon herb seasoning mix. It smelled fantastic while baking and the bread tasted heavenly.

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  105. Is there something I could use instead of corn meal? I can't eat corn. Thanks Jenn

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  106. INCREDIBLE! I am new to the glutten free cooking and am so glad to have come across this recipe. This is a great loaf of REAL bread.
    Nothing like the store bought kind. It is everything I look for in a loaf.
    THANK YOU for sharing!

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  107. Hi Ali, I work in weight rather than volume with my gluten free baking and have experienced far better results. Do you have a weight conversion for the flours, psylluim and chia??? Thanks

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  108. I've made this bread a couple of times and we love it! However, it seems to get a little gummy in the middle of the loaf towards the bottom crust.. Am I not adding enough flour to it? I've baked it foro almost an hour and it still turns out that way.

    Do you store it in the fridge or just on the counter?

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  109. Thank you...this is my 1st successful loaf of gluten free bread....after more than 20 failed attempts at different online recipes, I am on cloud nine! Even my husband who gently encouraged me to give up on my quest...that he'd rather never again eat bread than to eat the breads I bake! Lol...well, guess who I had to hide this loaf on after he downed 4 slices before dinner was even served. Thank you, thank you, thank you!

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  110. I just made this and it is by far the BEST I have even made in 5 years. THANKYOU THANKYOU THANKYOU!!!

    Jillian (Toronto)

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  111. Re: The gluten free bread

    I loved it for a long time but I can't seem to eat it anymore (IBS-Colitis). It seems to be too heavy. I thought it was the yeast but I am not sure. I suspect that it may be the combination of chia seeds/ psyllium. Do you have any ideas about how to use the recipe so it is easier to digest...I think that is the issue. Thanks a lot!

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  112. Just made this two days ago, and it was fantastic! So easy and so delicious. I'm really happy to find an egg-free and xanthan-free bread recipe that actually has chewiness and a good crumb. I think I have to make another batch, because it was so good that we already finished it. Thanks for the great recipe.

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  113. I have never baked anything before and this was awesome! My wife and kids eat gluten free and vegan when we can so this was great to try. The instructions were excellent and the result was delicious. I baked my second loaf last night and do believe I've stumbled upon a great hobby...Thank you very much Ali, I'm grateful for your effort...Micah

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  114. I made this exactly as written and it is excellent. Thank you for such a great recipe!

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  115. Thanks for creating and sharing this recipe! It's a wonderful recipe for a good, healthy gluten-free bread. So great to use psyllium and ground chia seed and also to be able to knead it. I've tried a few flour combos and I have come to like using sorghum, millet and a little teff, along with almond meal and a little garbanzo bean flour. I like a little teff, but it's a little strong if I use a full cup. I was able to find most of these flours at a local indian store -- they are also less expensive than the typical Bob's Red Mill comparable ones. I have been making it in a loaf pan and a make the recipe a little larger so I can get a more 'normal' size loaf. I also add in some vitamin c/ascorbic acid; I have read that it it a natural preservative and it also feeds the yeast. Thanks again for sharing! Love this this bread recipe. :)

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  116. breadmachinebakerJuly 31, 2013 at 3:03 AM

    I am not gluten intolerant but wanted to experiment with a gluten-free diet. I chose to make this bread since it is whole grain and also vegan.

    Not having enough chia seeds, I made up for the difference with flax seeds. With my regular 14-speed blender I used the "grind" setting, the next to fastest speed, to grind the seeds.

    I made my bread in my bread machine, as I do all yeast breads, so instead of following the directions given in the recipe, I did as is done on all of my bread machine bread recipes:

    1. Start with room temperature ingredients.
    2. Place the liquid ingredients (except yeast) in the bread pan of the machine.
    3. Add the dry ingredients; make an indentation in the top and place the yeast in it.

    After setting the bread machine on the whole wheat setting with a medium crust and 1 1/2 pound size loaf [see Note], I started the machine. As the machine started to knead the dough 30 minutes later, I quickly discovered that the dough was much much too wet, so I added more flour until it was the right consistency (no problem with stickiness). I didn't measure how much had to be added but wouldn't be surprised if it was 1/4 cup, as some of the others have mentioned.

    Since it is important not to allow a bread machine to punch down the dough, I paused it after the first rise and just before the "punch down", which in my Breadman Ultimate bread machine comes 1 hr. 40 min. after the machine was started; so I paused it 1 hr. 38 min. to 1 hr. 39 min. after starting the machine. Then I pushed the reset button, set the cycle to "bake", and started the machine again.

    To cool the bread, I place the bread machine pan on its side on a cooling rack for 2-3 minutes, turned it over to the other side for 2-3 minutes, removed the bread from the bread machine pan, and placed the bread on the cooling rack until completely cool.

    The bread holds together very well and slices easily. However, I don't care for the taste. Some of you have mentioned not liking the taste of the teff flour, so I'll try again later with different flours.

    [Note: The finished loaf weighs 2 1/2 pounds, so next time I'll probably halve the recipe and use the 1 1/2 pound setting again.

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  117. breadmachinebakerJuly 31, 2013 at 3:17 AM

    For those wanting to know the weights of ingredients in grams:

    1/3 cup ground chia seeds, 32 grams
    1/3 cup whole psyllium husks, 27 grams
    1 cup teff flour, 200 grams
    1 cup sorghum flour, 136 grams
    1/2 cup sweet rice flour, 80 grams
    1/2 cup cornmeal (whole grain), 70 grams

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  118. breadmachinebakerJuly 31, 2013 at 3:48 AM

    Another addendum:

    Hopefully I specified in the previous post that avoiding the "punch down" of the bread in a bread machine is only for gluten-free breads.

    A trick I recently read about, and tried (successfully) for the first time when making this bread, for keeping from having a hole from the kneading paddle in the bottom of the finished loaf of bread, is to remove the paddle before the last rise (which in this case is the only one).

    My pet peeve is finally solved. Now I can feel free to share loaves of bread machine bread with others!

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  119. I make this bread and it become so good , This is the BEST bread I made since I become a GF 3 years ago.
    I have one question to ask: is this specific psyllium brand is manufacture in gluten free facility???
    I purchase psyllium that packet in facility with wheat and I had stomach pain.
    Thank you
    Yael

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  120. Could this be made in an electric breadmaker machine?

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  121. Wow!! After so much searching for a bread recipe that doesn't have a million ingredients in it, and quite resembles wheat bread, this one is a winner!!
    Thank you for posting it! You've made my day!!
    Kelly

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  122. Do you use coarse grind Cornmeal or Medium grind? Yhe medium looks more like a flour.

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  123. We LOOOOVE this recipe!!! Has anyone had any luck doubling the recipe? Want to know before I try...

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  124. First time ever making GF bread. Adjusted the recipe for what I had - flax instead of chia seeds and Bob's Red Mill GF all-purpose flour instead of your mix. Worked wonderfully! How lovely to have yummy bread again after so long!

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  125. My kids declared this better than the bread I used to buy at Whole Foods. I consider that a big win! I love it, too - tastes like a good, dense German bread. Thank you!

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  126. I would like to join a long line of the followers who praise this recipe. I baked “No Knead Bread” according to a recipe from Sulivan Street Bakery http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/08/dining/081mrex.html?_r=0
    for a long time. This is a wheat bread. Then I read Wheat Belly book and switched to non-wheat diet and started experiments with non-wheat bread. This recipe shows acceptable results. Bread looks like a bread, tastes like a bread (German style) and this is what I need.
    I already baked five prototypes and streamlined taste a bit and cost as well.
    Here are changes to original recipe:
    - Maple syrup or sugar was eliminated (first spoon supports yeast activation, temperature does the same)
    - Chia seeds were replaced with ground flax seeds (cost cutting)
    - TEFF was replaced with buckwheat flour and millet flour, seems to me TEFF makes the bread heavier (cost cutting as well)
    - Corn meal substituted with almond meal, my personal preference
    - Baking time extended to 55 minutes
    - A dough was raised in the oven by 110F (43C) for 1 hour
    - No steam

    My modified recipe looks like this
    Wet Ingredients:
    2 ½ cups warm water (105 to 110 degrees F)
    2 ¼ teaspoons active dry yeast
    2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
    35g ground flax seeds
    30g psyllium husk
    Dry Ingredients:
    100g buckwheat flour
    100g millet flour
    140g sorghum flour
    80g rice flour
    80g almond meal
    20-30g ground caraway seeds
    1 ½ teaspoons sea salt
    Topping:
    sesame seeds
    coarse salt

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  127. I am really impressed with this recipe. I followed exactly and it came out amazing. Wonderful texure, a real artisan loaf with nice crust and spongy inside. Great taste - hearty. Cuts nicely, not crumbly like most GF. You can actually make a sandwich with it. I am so appreciative that you figured this out for us. thank you.

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  128. I just made this. The only substitution I made was I used pumpkin seeds instead of chia seeds. It was DELICIOUS! I will definitely be making this regularly. Thank you so much!

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  129. Made this last week and making another batch today, wow what an amazing bread!!!! so delish, thanks so much for sharing
    Marianne

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  130. So glad to see you back posting recipes, I am making the farmhouse bread rising, my dough seemed to be i
    A bit sticky but wouldn't come together really well. Unsure if more moisture or more flour is needed. After baking I will probably figure it out based on how it bakes.
    Just wondering if that is what the dough should be,
    Thanks again.
    Most of the recipes we have tried are staples in our home,

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  131. I just made this today and it is wonderful! I altered it a little by removing the rice flour and using more sorghum, and substituting millet for the teff flour. So yummy and I'm excited to have found a recipe that both works and is delicious! One question...what's the best way to store this?

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  132. First, thank you for all the education, recipes,desire to set people free from health issues and be their own advocate.
    In regards to the bread recipes, I continually end up with dense but sticky bread. I double checked, temp, bought new thermometer, new yeast, watched you bake amazing buns, but some reason the recipes end up heavy. The bread rises, and then stops, probably a third of what needs to take place. Can't seem to get it to a full rise.
    We reside in mn, but the house is warm,
    Checked my oven, cooks a little above the temp.
    I really would like to feed my kids nutritious bread, but I just keep getting the same experiences,
    Ugh, any more insight is greatly appreciated,
    Thank you for your time, many of the recipes are staples in our home. Just the bread seems to be a challenge.

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  133. Wow, what fabulous bread! I love it. So does my husband and mother, and both of them eat gluten regularly. It cuts just like gluten-filled bread. Thank you for coming up with this idea and sharing it with others. I'm going to check out your cook book - Nourishing Meals:)

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  134. Greetings,
    This is one of the best bread I have ever made and enjoyed my husband loves it. I don't use cornmeal so I sub it with almond flour.We are also don't do gluten. I have to made one ever week it don't last, more because of my husband. THANK YOU love it.

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  135. Thank you for this recipe post, I made this bread today, it is wonderful! Hearty, wholesome just like homemade whole wheat bread! love it, I'm sharing it with my gluten-free friends.

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  136. The best gluten-free bread I've tried. A real winner. Rich wholesome flavor, cuts just like regular bread. Tried with flax seeds too, but got a bit soggier result; chia seeds work best. The whole family loves it, even my teens. A huge thank you for sharing the recipe.

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  137. We are just baking it for the second time. It is amazing. Today we tripled the amount.

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  138. I love the idea of using ground chia in the place of xanthan gum. Can you give me a rule of thumb for chia/xanthan substitution? This is a great recipe! I substituted ground quinoa for the cornmeal. I love that it will toast!

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  139. Made this bread today exactly as per recipe. I wouldn't be able to guess it's gluten free! A hearty bread memory came back and now the only problem is not eating it all at once haha!Really hit the bread spot. Thanks for sharing it. Would it freeze well? Whole or in slices?

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  140. HI ALI,CAN I USE BAKING POWDER OR SODA INSTEAD OF YEAST?
    THANK YOU

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  141. Great, great recipe. I have been making this bread for months and we love it. I found that I can substitute almost any flour to change the taste once in a while. I made a version with 1 cup cornmeal, 1 cup rice flour and 1 cup tapioca flour and it turned out great. I'm planning to try with quinoa. Thank you so much for this recipe!

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  142. I just made this bread and it is delicious! I have really missed the hearty brown bread I ate before I had to start eating gluten free. I made the bread from the recipe exactly as published (except I baked it for 50 minutes) and it is perfect! I have never cared for white bread. You have made me very happy with this amazing recipe! Thank you so much!

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Thanks, and as always, Happy Cooking! Ali & Tom