Monday, December 14, 2009

Soy-Free Tamari Roasted Nuts


For those of you following a soy-free diet, and who are desperately missing your tamari, I have found a fantastic alternative! The South River Miso Company makes a wonderful gluten/wheat-free and soy-free tamari! How do they do it?

Here is what they say on their website: In Japanese, tamari means "little puddle" and refers to the savory liquid that collects in a vat of miso. Our genuine tamari is similar to its cousin, soy sauce, but much sweeter and lighter in taste. Friends who buy directly from our shop come back year after year, declaring that there is no seasoning comparable to South River Miso Tamari. Gathered from the vats of AZUKI BEAN MISO -- Made from deep well water, organic brown rice, organic azuki beans, sun-dried sea salt, organic sea vegetables, and koji culture. Aged in wood for a minimum of 3 months.

I was so happy to recently find this soy-free tamari alternative on Kim's Affairs of Living Blog! Kim writes a great blog full of recipes and ideas for Elimination Diet-friendly meals. If you are doing the Elimination Diet from our cookbook, then her site will be a big help.

If you have a chance to try South River's chickpea miso or adzuki miso please do! They are simply delicious. The miso is made using rice koji instead of barley koji. If you live in Bellingham you can find this fabulous miso at Terra Organica. They don't sell the tamari though...at least not yet!



Smokey Soy-Free Tamari Roasted Nuts

If you don't have any issues with soy you could of course use regular wheat-free tamari in place of the adzuki bean tamari. I've added a little smoked Spanish paprika to these which gives the nuts more flavor with a hint of smoke. This is totally optional. You could omit the paprika or add crushed dried rosemary for a savory flavor or try chipotle chili powder for a kick! Make sure you follow the directions and roast the nuts first, then add the tamari, and roast again for a few minutes. You'll have a burned mess if you roast them all at once, trust me, I know! These nuts make a fabulous appetizer for a holiday gathering or a great afterschool snack for your kids. Enjoy!

1 cup raw cashews
1 cup raw almonds
2 to 3 tablespoons tamari
1 to 2 teaspoons smoked paprika

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place nuts into a 9 x 13-inch glass baking dish.

Roast in the oven for 12 to 15 minutes (watch timing as oven temps vary). Remove pan from oven and quickly add the tamari and smoked paprika. Toss together with a spatula.

Return pan to oven and roast for about 3 minutes more.

The nuts become crispy when cooled. Store in an airtight jar. Source: www.NourishingMeals.com.

*Notes: You may need to alter the amount of tamari here if you use the regular wheat-free tamari. Start with less as I am not sure how the salt content differs.


Other appetizer's you might enjoy:

17 comments:

  1. Those look wonderful and yummy!

    Bee Happy!

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  2. YUM! I recently saw a coconut based sub for soy sauce that is soy free.

    http://blog.wholefoodsmarket.com/2009/10/whats-new-october-2009/

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  3. Ali-
    these look delicious and great for a snack or party.
    Do you have any recipes for "pralined" pecans or almonds? I'd love to make both for holiday snacking! Thanks for the continued recipes throughout the busy holiday season!

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  4. Wow, thanks for the call out, Ali! These look wonderful, by the way. I just got home from New York and plan to try out a few more recipes from your book. I tried the Peachy Millet Muffins with pear puree instead of peach and a couple other tweaks and they were amazing...just ate the last two last night : ) Thanks again for the mention in your post, and have a great week! -Kim

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  5. thanks for the tip- i've been looking for a gf/soy free soy sauce sub for a while... i'm ordering some today! :)

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  6. These look really moreish. I think I would be eating them non stop, so I guess its good that I am just looking at them, than eating them :D

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  7. Loved these! I used san-j wheat free tamari, about 1 1/5 tbls. Thanks for the great recipe Ali.

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  8. Oh wow. Those nuts look to-die-for! I love the flavours =D. How interesting about the soy-free tamari! I had no idea it was possible!

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  9. I want some! Might be just the thing to make for a party we're attending this weekend. It's very neat that there are some alternatives to soy with the same taste. Thanks for sharing this one, Ali! Special thanks on the warning to keep us from having a burned mess!

    Shirley

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  10. I was just on the South River Miso site and it looks like their Tamari sauce is no longer soy free.

    Here are the ingredients now:
    Gathered from the vats of DANDELION LEEK MISO -- Made from deep well water, organic brown rice, organic black and yellow soy beans, sun-dried sea salt, dandelion greens, wild leeks, nettle greens, organic sea vegetables, and koji culture. Aged in wood for a minimum of 30 months.

    it doesn't seem to be made from the Adzuki Bean Miso any more, and has yellow soy beans in it. : (

    any other suggestions?

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  11. coconut secret has coconut aminos that its supposed to be like soy sauce. It may be a little sweeter and less salty but it seems like it might be a good substitute. I haven't tried it yet but I am wanting to get some soon.

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  12. For Dot,
    Have you tried this?
    Heat one cup of almonds (with skins) in a skillet until you begin to smell them. Stir in 1/4 cup maple syrup and continue to stir until it crystallizes.
    Cool and store tightly covered.
    I did this with almonds and pecans for on top of pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving. we didn't miss the whipped cream at all.
    -Janice

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  13. I was looking for tamari and saw also that they were out of any soy-free tamari. I contacted them and was told they should have more soy free tamari some time in November :)

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  14. Thank you for the great suggestions. I'm going to look for the coconut aminos as soon as I can get to Whole Foods. I'd love it if it were less salty, as I'm on a low sodium diet.

    I too contacted South River Miso Company, and they also told me that it would be sometime in November, but they assured me they would let me know when it is available.

    Thanks again everyone!
    wendy

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  15. Hi,

    I wish I could indulge in that soy-free soy sauce. I'm always amazed when people who are allergic to soy go ahead and eat other legumes freely. They are in the same family. If a person is allergic to soy isn't likely they will react to other legumes? Perhaps not. I came up positive to soy, peanuts (a legume), navy beans and a few more. I can't risk a swollen/constricted esophagus. It's a real bummer for me. I dig tofu and soy products. I guess I'll look for coconut aminos that "M" mentioned.

    The recipe looks good though.

    K-

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  16. I just wanted to add that I found the Coconut Amino Acids and they are very tasty. They smell more alcoholish than regular soy sauce, but they aren't as salty, and they don't have an alcohol taste. They are made by Coconut Secrets. And I did find them at Whole Foods. http://www.coconutsecret.com
    On their website you can find a list of stores that carry their products (however, not all stores carry all products) And a list of places to get it on line.

    Good luck!
    wendy

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