Monday, April 27, 2009

Best Gluten-Free, Vegan Sandwich Bread

Are you craving a big sandwich with your favorite fixings right now? This recipe makes a large loaf perfect for making excellent sandwiches, french toast, or a lovely slice of toast and jam. Try it spread with almond butter for a quick breakfast on the run!

UPDATE: We don't make this recipe anymore. Try this gluten-free vegan bread recipe instead....it's much tastier!

This recipe is well-tested. I worked with it a few months ago a number of times, eight maybe, or more. I also sent it on to my army of recipe testers to make sure it was fool-proof.

I have learned a lot from all of them (thank you)! And so I will offer you some trouble-shooting tips if for some reason your results don't match mine. Gluten-free yeast breads can be so tricky sometimes!

For another whole grain, gluten-free yeast bread you can check out our Dark Teff Sandwich Bread recipe.

Tips for making Gluten-Free Yeast Breads (from my own experiences):

1. Measure correctly! Use a knife to level off the flour and check at eye-level when measuring liquids in a glass-measure. Just a little bit too much flour or too little water can throw a recipe off. Be careful with the xanthan gum too, if this is off just a little the results could be drastic!

2. Don't bake when you are distracted or very tired. I know this from experience! Did I add that xanthan gum or not??

3. Make sure your oven is calibrated to the correct temperature. An inexpensive oven thermometer placed inside of the oven can tell you what the actual temperature is. Adjust your dial accordingly.

4. Make sure your dry ingredients are well-mixed. There was a time that I forgot to add the xanthan gum to my French Bread recipe (must have been distracted) and so I added it at the end after I had added the wet ingredients. I had french bread dough running out of the side of the pan, it was a total mess!

5. After the dough has been mixed, be your own judge and add a little bit of water (usually a tablespoon at a time) to get the consistency of thick cake batter. I made this recipe again this past Friday and realized it was too thick (I may have over measured ever so slightly or my ingredients held less moisture) and so I added 1/4 cup more of warm water to get the consistency I was looking for. You would do this with baking gluten bread only you would add (wheat) flour a little at a time. I have found that with my vegan, gluten-free bread adding water a little at a time works well.

6. When rising this dough make sure your environment is neither too hot nor too cool. Placing the bread pan in a warm water bath works well. I simply place the bread pan into a 9 x 13-inch pan and add hot tap water, boiling water is too hot for this recipe. The hot water cools fairly quickly and you are left with a nice warm water bath.

7. You be the judge to determine when it has finished rising. It takes me about an hour, though when my kitchen was very warm one day, it only took 40 minutes. Watch it and when it is doubled in size it is ready to go into your preheated oven.

8. If your recipe fails then take a look at these tips again to see where you could have made a mistake.

9. Though this recipe will stay fairly moist for days, freezing individual slices preserves the bread and makes it very easy to pop a slice in the toaster for a quick sandwich when you do not have time to make a whole loaf of bread. Simply slice the bread and place in between pieces of waxed paper then place into an airtight container in your freezer.

10. I almost forgot one very important tip, do not substitute ingredients. My recipes have been carefully tested and retested in a variety of ways and so using different ingredients could alter the recipe drastically.

If you have tips to share then please share them below in the comments section. Also, I would love to hear your results if you make this. It will help me with my next book. Thanks and enjoy! :)


Everyday Sandwich Bread
Here is a gluten-free bread that has a great flavor and texture that can be used daily for your favorite sandwich fillings. My favorite sandwich is made with raw almond butter and apricot jam. Though an avocado, hummus, tomato, and lettuce sandwich is up there too! Make two or three loaves at once and freeze some for future use.

2 to 2 ¼ cups warm water (100 to 110 degrees F)
2 teaspoons organic cane sugar or maple sugar
2 packages active dry yeast (4 ½ teaspoons)
⅓ cup honey, agave nectar, or maple syrup
⅓ cup grapeseed oil or extra virgin olive oil
1 cup millet flour
1 ½ cups sorghum flour
½ cup sweet rice flour
1 cup potato starch
½ cup tapioca flour
2 ½ teaspoons xanthan gum
2 teaspoons sea salt

1. Oil a 9 x 5-inch loaf pan.

2. Place 2 cups of the warm water and the sugar into a small bowl (a 4-cup liquid measure works well). Make sure the water is the right temperature. If the water is too cold the yeast will not become active and if the water is too hot it will kill the yeast. Add the yeast and stir. Proof the yeast by allowing it to stand for 5 to 10 minutes. It should become bubbly, if not start over with fresh yeast and water. Then add the honey and oil. Stir well with a fork or wire whisk.

3. In a large bowl, add the millet flour, sorghum flour, sweet rice flour, potato starch, tapioca flour, xanthan gum, and sea salt. Combine the flours with a wire whisk. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry and whisk them together as you are pouring to avoid lumps. Continue to whisk for another 60 seconds or so, or until the batter thickens and becomes smooth. Then use a large spoon and continue to stir for another minute. If the batter seems too thick then add up to ¼ cup more water and mix well.

4. Transfer batter to the oiled loaf pan and gently spread out with the back of a spoon, forming a loaf shape. Place pan in a warm spot (but not too hot) to rise. Let rise for 40 to 60 minutes, or until doubled in size. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

5. After it has risen, bake for 50 to 55 minutes. Let stand in the pan for about 10 minutes. Loosen sides with a knife and place onto a wire rack to cool. © Alissa Segersten 2009.
Source: www.NourishingMeals.com



74 comments:

  1. I can't wait to try this Ali. Thank you so much for sharing! I will let you know how my loaf comes out.

    My kids are going to love this!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Ali - I don't know if you remember me, I met you at your green smoothie demo at the new co-op the other day. My husband and I are so excited about your blog. You create recipes we can eat! I am so excited about this bread recipe. The stuff in the freezer section bores me, I look forward to the smell of fresh bread baking in my oven again! Kayla :-)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oh my gosh! This is the best bread, I made it right away and used your tips and measured very carefully. It turned out perfect. It is so much better than any bread I have purchased or made before. Thanks for creating a bread so that we can eat sandwiches again!!

    ReplyDelete
  4. That is a beautiful loaf of bread, and look already folks are trying it and having great success. Wow. :-)

    I've probably said this before, but I find it's important to stir gluten-free flours before spooning into a cup and leveling with a knife.

    As far as distractions, we are all guilty of that, but there are tricks you can do ... like have all the ingredients to the left of your bowl when you start and then move to the right after you use them. It really does help ... in case, the phone rings or you child needs your attention half way through.

    Another way to freeze bread without using a ton of wax paper is to put single slices on a large cookie sheet. Place in the freezer uncovered for about 30 minutes until it feels fairly frozen. The fact that they are now individually frozen will keep them from completely sticking together. Then put the slices into an airtight freezer container like a ziploc bag. Now you can just take out slices as you need them. They defrost quickly. You can even put them in the toaster or in the oven to defrost. This method keeps your bread nice and fresh.

    Thanks, Ali--your rule with this kind of bread baking! :-)

    Shirley

    ReplyDelete
  5. Ali and Tom, Thank you for your recipes. How are your sweet little ones doing? Is your family through the chicken pox? You know I love bread. I don't need vegan but I just may give this one a try.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Oh man I really do miss having bread like that. I stink at baking and it takes me so long that I just give up. When are you going to start shipping bread? Let me know I'll be the first order! Maybe when school is out I'll get my son, the baker, to get me in the kitchen baking with him.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Your vegan bread looks very good. I still have some of your teff bread in my freezer. We don't rely on bread as a staple like we used to, but it is great every now and again. I'll let you know if I make this one and my results if it would be helpful.

    ReplyDelete
  8. THANK YOU for creating gluten free and egg free recipes! I was just starting to get the hang of gf baking when I realized I couldn't tolerate eggs. It is doable, but it's discouraging some days to bake without eggs. I would buy every cookbook you could generate with GF EF recipes! :)

    ReplyDelete
  9. yogamama - Let us know how your bread came out, it will help other readers, thanks!

    Kayla - Yes, I do remember you. Glad the blog can help, enjoy the recipes!

    Deb - Thanks for the feedback already! Glad you enjoyed it so much.

    Shirley - Thanks for all of the tips you shared. I really like the idea of putting ingredients on one side of the bowl and then moving them to the other side after you use them - I will do that from now on! Thanks so much for sharing your wisdom!

    Joyce - Yes everyone seems to be over the pox, thank goodness! I do know you love bread! Let me know how it turns out if you make it.

    Diane - How nice to have a baker son!

    David D. - Glad to hear you are enjoying the teff bread. Yes it would be helpful to have your feedback if you make this. Thanks!

    Jennifer - Great, thanks, I'll keep you posted on the next book. Enjoy the bread!

    Thanks, -Ali :)

    ReplyDelete
  10. I had the bread for breakfast this morning with a little almond butter and jam. It was so moist. The other thing I noticed was that I was able to maintain my blood sugar after eating this bread. Is that from the combination of flours Ali? I though I could share some other details when I made it. I did add about 1/16th more water at the end, tried to get it to the consistency you said and it seemed a little thick (I'm not always great on the exact measurements!) It rose in the pan of water in 45 minutes - beautifully I may add, and then baked for 53 minutes. I got my knife out to loosen the sides so it would release from the pan (I never needed to use it though) and the loaf slid right out, absolutely no sticking. I used a glass pan.

    Thanks again, I am going to take some to work tomorrow to share with someone who has just gone gluten free.

    I also liked the tips from Shirley about organizing the ingredients.
    Deb

    ReplyDelete
  11. Ali, I made your bread recipe yesterday and it turned out better than I expected. The only problem was that my husband and kids ate half of the loaf when it came out of the oven so I needed to make another.

    I used the bobs red mill sweet rice flour instead of the one you suggested and it seemed to work just fine.

    I have sandwiches ready to go for everyone today, thanks again for sharing this recipe!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hi Ali,
    The baking tips were very helpful -thanks! The sandwich bread is tasty! I've even tried making it in the bread machine and it worked pretty well.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I've made this several times and love it! I slice and freeze it and then take it out for toast. It is so convenient to have it ready to go. thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Hi Ali, I love how easily your breads go together and they taste better than anything else out there too! Since I met you I don't miss gluten :)

    ReplyDelete
  15. Was wondering if you have the nutritional value of this bread.
    Thank you
    Will be making this soon!!!

    ReplyDelete
  16. Thanks everyone for the comments on this bread. I didn't realize there were so many I had not responded to! In response to the most recent anon comment today - no I do not have nutritional values for this bread. I wish I did but just don't have the time right now to deal with that. There are websites online where you can enter in each ingredient and amount but I have not personally used them.

    Thanks, Ali :)

    ReplyDelete
  17. Do you have any suggestions for substitutions for the sweet white rice flour? I think I may have issues with rice so I'm leaving it out of my diet for at least a few weeks to see how it goes. I know you've only tested it with the listed ingredients, so I'm willing to experiment, but don't know what would be a good bet. Right now I'm avoiding gluten, rice, potato starch & flour.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Oh, Ali - you are my hero! This bread is magnificent! My 3 year old little man and I are gluten-, dairy- and egg-free. This is the best thing I've baked in my year of "alternate" baking. My son's dream of eating a sandwich is finally coming true.

    This success has inspired me to purchase new bakeware. Would you mind sharing what you use to bake this bread and what kind of bakeware you recommend in general? I definitely want something healthy - cast iron, stone, glass, stainless, whatever!

    Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!

    ReplyDelete
  19. Deac-in-training - Hmm, since you are avoiding rice and potatoes I would suggest trying out my Teff Sandwich Bread Recipe - on this blog, click on "Yeast Breads" under Categories on the left of the blog. I have a few other rice/potato-free recipes that will be in my next book. Hope this helps! :)

    ReplyDelete
  20. Susan - Thanks, I am glad you guys enjoyed this. I use a glass pyrex bread pan for this loaf. Actually for all of my yeast breads I prefer to use glass. For quick breads and muffins I find that stoneware works best. :)

    ReplyDelete
  21. this is seriously awesome!! I've had such a hard time baking gluten free VEGAN bread without using a mix! I can't WAIT to try this recipe this weekend!! THANK YOU!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Okay! Don't be distracted when baking...I read that part. The next piece of advice is not to be distracted when copying the recipe, and don't be distracted the second time when checking it over! I followed the instructions that I wrote perfectly--leaving out the 1.5 cups of sorghum flour (I forgot to copy that part)! Third time is a charm--wish us luck :-). No more volcanic bread dough!

    ReplyDelete
  23. Huzzah! It was mostly a success. I am going to trust from here on out that our kitchen is warm enough for bread dough, even on cool fall days and skip the warm water bath entirely next time I make this. It always *feels* cool, so I assume it's not warm enough for yeast bread. Anyhow, it did not explode and drip everywhere. This time, the only evidence of the bread rising too fast was that the top cracked. In my excitement, I might have taken it out of the oven a touch too soon, but as of now, it's squishy and delightfully edible. Hurray! We are most excited to have some kind of bread thing with our sunburgers tonight! :-) Progress is sometimes a good thing!

    I asked my husband which bread I should make today, volcano bread or the usual rice bread stand-by and he gave an enthusiastic thumbs up for "volcano bread!" Dahlia is cheerfully using bread as a means to transport jam to her mouth.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I made this bread for the first time a week ago to see if it would work for turkey stuffing - like my mom used to make. I have missed so much the last 5 years.

    I am so very pleased to report that I made bread stuffing yesterday - and my thanksgiving meal is now complete once again.

    And bonus - turkey sandwiches (with avocado mayo) the day after.

    Thank you so much for all of your incredible recipes.

    Cindy Russell/City Books

    ReplyDelete
  25. This bread looks wonderful! I am having a terrible time baking bread in that my GF bread always sinks in the middle. I believe it is from too much liquid. But 1-1/2 inch to 2 inch high slices do not a good sandwich make. :-( I have had very limited success with decreasing the liquid - but I end up using a good 1/2 cup less than what the recipe calls for - which puzzles me. Most times there is still slight sinking.

    When you say "batter" - is this a pourable batter? Or a very stiff batter? Will it easily fall off of the spatula into the pan or is it thick enough that I will need to push it off the spatula?

    Dawn

    ReplyDelete
  26. I’m a real fan of all the bread recipes on this site, although I still like the honey whole grain bread from your book the most. Your tips are really handy. Along my own bread baking journey I have also found useful to:
    • Use a clear glass bowl to mix the flours – I lift the bowl up to see if any is left around the base of the bowl. I think adding starches last also helps.
    • I don’t have a thermometer but I find mixing 1/3 boiling water with 2/3 cold water seems to get good results when proofing the yeast. It will still depend a bit on the temperature of cold water.
    • To me the right thickness of the mixture / batter seems to be a tablespoon worth slowly falling off the spoon.

    Anyway thank you for all the recipes; it has been really wonderful to be able to eat sandwiches and toast again.

    ReplyDelete
  27. We're mostly gluten-free due to fructose mal (wheat=fructans) so we can't use honey/maple syrup/etc. We can use plain sugar in moderation. Does anyone have any suggestions for replacing the syrup with sugar/water/other liquid? Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have recently bought stevia liquid and have been wondering if it can be substituted. If Ali or anyone has experience with this I sure would like to know!

      Delete
  28. This bread smells amazing but when baking the bread over flows the 9x5 pan. Any ideas why?

    ReplyDelete
  29. I am trying desperately to make a good GF bread. The problem is that I cannot have corn or potato, either, which cuts out potato starch. I find that almost all recipes have either potato or corn starch, or eggs - then say not to substitute! What can I use???

    ReplyDelete
  30. Janet - I normally don't use potato starch in baking, this recipe is an exception though. If you would like to try a bread recipe w/o those ingredients you can try my dark teff bread: http://www.nourishingmeals.com/2009/03/dark-teff-sandwich-bread.html

    Enjoy! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Janet - the Teff bread is my very favorite - I am sure you will enjoy it!

      Delete
  31. Marnie - if your bread overflowed then it could have risen too hot or for too long. Your kitchen may already be warm enough to rise the bread w/o a warm pan of water underneath. The liquid to dry ingredients ratio also could be slightly off. Too much liquid could be part of the problem - we all measure differently so this can be tricky. Hope this helps. :)

    ReplyDelete
  32. Hi Ali, this made wonderful chocolate chip bread for our school festival tonight! As you suggested I added 1/2 cup of the enjoy life mini chips. Also, I didn't have sweet rice flour, so I used brown rice flour. I ground millet in my vitamix for millet flour and that worked fine too. Thanks Ali this is a super recipe!!!

    ReplyDelete
  33. I hope this posts in the right place. I just tried to make the best vegan sandwich bread. I HAVEN'T been impressed with store-made GF breads at all! The taste of this bread is amazing! But it seems to be a bit heavy/spongy. I made sure to measure everything carefully (including the xanthum gum), but I DIDN'T have millet flour, so I used an extra 1/2 cut sorghum, and 1/2 cup sweet rice flour. Could using more of one of those flours have made it spongy? Or maybe I should've cooked it longer? Any tips will help! I was proud of attempt #1, but want it perfect next time! Thank you!!!

    ReplyDelete
  34. Hi,

    Your bread looks really good in the picture. I would like to try it but can't find sweet rice flour in England. May I know what can I use to replace it in your bread recipe?

    ReplyDelete
  35. Hi again,

    It's ok. I can get the sweet rice flour in England. Over here we call it 'glutinous rice flour'. Just the name, actually it has no gluten in it. By the way, can I replace millet flour with brown rice flour in this recipe?

    ReplyDelete
  36. I've made this bread dozens of times and use it as a base for all sorts of yummy things (cinnamon rolls that are incredibly delicious!) but the size is not correct for my pans. You say it makes one loaf but what size pan are you using? I use the basic glass pans you can find in most stores and it seems to make about 1.5 loaves.

    I wouldn't mind a bigger pan so that my bread size would rival store bought bread.

    I generally double the recipe and make 3 loaves from it.

    Any suggestions?

    ReplyDelete
  37. I finally made this recipe and it tastes truly awesome. Thank you for sharing! My bread also flowed over the 9x5 pan, but I KNOW that I did indeed overrise the bread. Looking forward to our next baking and paying better attention to the dough so it doesn't overrise.

    Thank you Ali for another great recipe!

    ReplyDelete
  38. I have Hashimoto's and have been advised not to eat millet. You recommend no substitutions but I have a hard time finding gf bread recipes without millet. I have looked at your other recipes and look forward to trying them but do you have a suggestion for a substitution? Also, perhaps you have some knowledge about needing to omit millet when diagnosed with hashimotos? thanks very much!

    ReplyDelete
  39. oh wow!!! i cannot believe how amazing this bread came out!! i have just started baking gluten free...our house is vegan...after many attempts to find a decent bread (because it still is a staple in my house..i was skeptical about finding one that my kids would be fooled by....I cannot say thank you enough...you are my current hero :)

    ReplyDelete
  40. Hi, I just made it with minor differences, and you can find the execution here:
    http://glutenfreebakingpixie.blogspot.com/2011/06/sandwich-bread.html
    It doesn't look as good as yours but it tastes great.

    ReplyDelete
  41. I always have challenges with gluten-free baking recipes. I know it's important not to substitute, but I'm allergic to millet, rice, almonds, coconut (very severe), and palm oil. Almost every GF recipe in existence calls for rice... so I'm ALWAYS substituting and making up my own recipes. I wonder if there are any other GF people out there with allergies to rice and other popular ingredients (everyone uses almond and coconut for everything these days in natural health communities!!)

    ReplyDelete
  42. Imli

    It must be very hard for you.
    For baking without rice flour you might have a look at the recipe index at:

    http://glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com/p/site-index.html

    It features some good bread and other allergen-free baking. As I recall the owner of that site can't eat rice and possibly nuts too, plus a number of other things.

    Another suggestion is to do a google search like:

    recipe gluten free bread -millet -rice -almond -coconut

    See if that arrangement of keywords turns up anything useful for you.

    I've often subbed out flours in gluten free breads and it hasn't been a problem. Sorghum, teff, buckwheat, chickpea flour, are all possible subs for millet in your baking.

    Hope this helps

    ReplyDelete
  43. Ali

    This looks like a fabulous loaf of bread. Kudos to you for honing the recipe to perfection in the midst of your own very busy life.

    I admire anyone with such coping skills. And all the while you're devising new recipes and generously giving them out to a very needy community of allergy sufferers. People like you are a blessing to the rest of us.

    Marie

    ReplyDelete
  44. I used all maple syrup for sweeteners and sunflower seed oil because I can't have fruit and grains together. I set the bread to rise in warm water in my sink, and when I came back it had overflowed in chunks all over the water. Not being one to waste, I scooped the watery chunks into silicone muffin cups and baked them along with the bread (took them out sooner). The result was like biscuits and we all loved them! I think I'll make biscuits for a shortcake-like "birthday cake" for my son's 5th birthday party this weekend.

    Thanks for a recipe that the combined intolerances of my family can tolerate!!!

    ReplyDelete
  45. I just made this bread for the first time. I followed the instructions carefully, read all of the initial comments, and used an oven thermometer to monitor my oven's temperature. The bread rose very high, and it had doubled in size in 35 minutes - my apartment is very warm. I baked it for 50 minutes, and when tapped the bread sounded hollow. The crust was nice and brown, but within 5 minutes of taking it out of the oven, the bread collapsed. Any ideas of what may have gone wrong? Is it possible that the bread was undercooked?

    ReplyDelete
  46. Anon - it sounds like your flour to water ration was slightly off - not enough flour or too much liquid. Different measuring techniques account for this.

    ReplyDelete
  47. Hmm ok, thanks for your quick response! To measure, I spooned dry ingredients into a measuring cup then leveled it off. The dough did seem a little thin though, so maybe next time that I try this recipe I will start with a little less than 2 cups of water!

    ReplyDelete
  48. This is the best bread Ive ever tasted. I made it and it was easy. The only thing was that it rose so much some of it fell out of the pan. I couldve used two pan for one recipe lol. Wonderful work, Thanks a bunch!!! :)

    ReplyDelete
  49. Who has made this with a bread machine? I have the Zojirushi mini.

    Would love some advice.

    ReplyDelete
  50. Has anyone ever used tapioca starch in place of the potato flour?

    ReplyDelete
  51. How thick is too thick? what should the consistency be?

    ReplyDelete
  52. I just made this bread yesterday. I had been so intimidated to try it, I think because I don't have a lot of experience working with yeast, and also because it seemed like there were so many ways I could mess it up...I didn't want to start. But, I faced my fears...I made it...and it's DELICIOUS!! It smells wonderful and tastes wonderful...the texture is great too. NO MORE store-bought bread for my family. :-) Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  53. For Charles: I just got my mini Zojirushi yesterday and adapted this recipe to make in the bread machine. Here's what I did:
    I cut the recipe in half.
    1 cup water
    1/2 cup millet flour
    3/4 cup sorghum flour
    1/4 cup sweet rice flour
    1/2 cup potato starch
    1/4 cup tapioca flour
    1 1/4 tsp xanthan gum
    1 tsp salt
    2 tbsp + 2 tsp olive oil
    2 tbsp + 2 tsp agave
    1 tsp sugar
    1 1/2 tsp quick rise yeast

    First, I put the water in the bread pan. Then
    I measured and mixed all of the flour ingredients in a separate bowl and added them on the water. I then measured in the oil, agave and sugar (and put them in on the side of the pan). Last, I put in the yeast. Careful, this flour is soaked through easily! I just sprinkled it on top and then "buried" it with the flour! I set the machine to quick breads and voila!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  54. I know you said not to substitute ingredients, but I'm allergic to rice. Can the sweet rice flour be substituted? I've tried other recipes and have subbed tapioca starch in it's place. Do you think that might work?

    ReplyDelete
  55. I am new to this lifestyle and have to avoid yeast. Does using dry yeast constitute yeast or not? Im confused on whether this bread is yeast free?

    ReplyDelete
  56. I am new to this lifestyle and need to avoid yeast. Does using dry yeast negate it being a yeast free bread?

    ReplyDelete
  57. Angela - I am really not sure about substitutions here. Bread recipes are tricky and when you change one ingredient you will need to change another most likely. Sweet rice flour absorbs about 2x as much liquid as tapioca or arrowroot, so that is something to keep in mind when making changes.

    Anon - This is NOT a yeast-free bread, sorry! You could try my yeast-free flatbread: http://www.nourishingmeals.com/2009/09/whole-grain-flatbread-gluten-free-yeast.html

    ReplyDelete
  58. I can't believe I missed this posting on vegan bread! I can't wait to make it. I'm already scrambling around my pantry to see if I have all of the necessary ingredients! Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  59. barefoothippiechick - If you are looking for a gluten-free vegan bread recipe then you might also want to check out my newer recipe that is a bit healthier and does not use any xanthan gum (it is our favorite): http://www.nourishingmeals.com/2011/04/gluten-free-bread-xanthan-free-vegan.html

    ReplyDelete
  60. Thank you for this great bread. It was easy, and rose great. I have been trying different breads for months with no success, and now that I have found your website I am happily eating bread again, and it is healthy bread too (dark teff bread is also a great bread!). Looking forward to trying out some other recipes.

    ReplyDelete
  61. Just made this bread and have it cooling on the rack. Is there a reason why I can't let it cool in the loaf pan? My question though is how should I store this bread? Is it best to keep it in the refrigerator or just leave it out?

    ReplyDelete
  62. I have love my own bread recipe but I get B-O-R-E-D BORED with the same old recipe. I found your this the other day and tried it tonight... WOW! Seriously, you are AMAZING! This bread was absolutely delightful and was able to be cooked in the professional loaf sized pan my Mom bought (I tried doing it in my 4.5 x 8 pan but it was overflowing. Thankfully my son pointed it out and helped transfer to the bigger one. This was a WIN with my Mom, and my Dad who has been the grumpiest old man about going GFCF. Thank you! This is definitely in our rotation.

    ReplyDelete
  63. This is the first gf vegan bread that has actually turned out for me! Many thanks to you my son is very happy!!! I've made it a couple of times now and had to add at least 1/3 more cup of water.

    ReplyDelete
  64. This recipe is great! i made it with a comibination of quino and almond flour instead of surghum (pretty hard to get the ingrediƫnts here in Holland!)
    But thanks I think you made a six year old girl very happy!

    ReplyDelete
  65. I have read several comments on this blog as well as others regarding measuring carefully. One thing I haven't seen addressed is that not all measuring cups and spoons are created equal. As a general rule plastic sets are less accurate than metal sets. Also measure from the same sets instead of mix and match if at all possible. Another trick is to convert recipes to metric weights instead of measuring. Has anyone tried making this recipe in a bread machine? I have a Zojirushi that allows me to do custom settings.

    ReplyDelete
  66. Hi Ali, I just made your bread last night and it turned out great! It was my first gluten-free loaf and my first loaf period outside of the breadmaker. We have become gluten-free for just over a week, and my husband is eating vegan for the last 7 weeks. The bread was a big hit here! I have one question for you though. I found the bread to taste a little on the bitter side and not so sweet. it smelled a little yeasty - is this normal? I used maple syrup and plain white sugar in the yeast mixture. I used sorghum flour, not sweet sorghum flour which I saw in the store. Should I have bought the sweet kind? After the yeast bubbled up it sat there a little while while I measured the flours with my daughter, as she insisted on helping. I was wondering if maybe I let the mixture sit too long before stirring it into the flours? Anyway, just wondering. My husband has asked me to stick with this recipe for him and the kids! He said it is fantastic. Thank you for your recipe!

    ReplyDelete
  67. Regarding your ingredients: Honey isn't vegan.

    ReplyDelete
  68. I just found your page and would love to try your sandwich bread. I am curious if I could bake this one in a 1.5 lbs bread machine instead? On a Gf cycle? Thank you for your time to reply.

    Could you email me your answer if possible? danaevans1982@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  69. This recipe is incredible!!!! All of my gluten-free breads have been relatively unsuccessful and dense but this turned out perfectly. I know you wrote not to use any substitutes but I had to sub amaranth flour for the sorghum flour (I didn't have any and I had already began the process) but it didn't hurt the recipe at all. No more store-bought breads for me :).

    Thanks so much again for your hard work and sharing your recipes.

    Is it okay if I share this recipe by attaching your link on my blog?

    ReplyDelete
  70. Do you have to use sweet rice flour ? My household has multiple food allergies, so my ingredients are subject to approval by cross-contamination issues.

    There is a safe Brown Rice Flour and Safe White Rice flour I can use, but not a safe sweet rice flour...

    ReplyDelete
  71. Hi, I love this bread but am having a lot of trouble using the breadmaker. I find the bread is wet/sticky on the top and I have to put it in the oven for a bit after the maker stops. I followed the yogirushu method (liquid on the bottom then dry ingredients, then yeast). I put the psyllium husks and chia seeds in with the wet ingredients and did wait for them to set (I did the first time). I really like the taste but the doughy bit at the top is not so nice. Any suggestions?

    ReplyDelete
  72. I'm a true rookie bread maker. (Read between the lines.....). I've made this recipe 3 times and, for me, it makes 2 loaves & 2 "hamburger buns". Each time, my bread cooks over the top and then falls like crazy once out of the oven. My bread pans are cast iron and measure 9x5. What am I doing wrong?? I took pics of the last attempt if you want to see them.

    ReplyDelete

.
.
Thanks for stopping by The Whole Life Nutrition Kitchen. We appreciate and value your feedback.

If you have a question about a particular recipe please leave your comment under that post. I will answer substitution questions as best as I can. Though if you alter a recipe, your feedback will help other readers who may have similar questions.

If you have a question on a particular product I use in my recipes, then please view the Links to Products We Use post for more information.

Comment moderation is in place. Your comment will be visible once we publish it.

Thanks, and as always, Happy Cooking! Ali & Tom